Cat & Dog Neutering

Cat and dog neuteringQuality Neutering Surgery for Pets in Mississauga

Elective surgeries like ovario-hysterectomy (spay) and orchiectomy (neuter) appear to be items to “shop” for, but please keep in mind that surgery and anesthesia is not something to be shopped by price, but by quality. 

Think about whether you want a cheap surgery or a quality surgery.  There are vast differences from hospital to hospital, and surgeon to surgeon, regarding experience, care, pain control, and safety. Please ‘shop’ carefully.

Included with the price of surgery at Clarkson Village Animal Hospital:

  • Pre-operative checkup with the veterinarian
  • Pain medication before, during, and after surgery
  • Pain Medication to be given at home
  • Intravenous fluids – a must for hydration, emergency access to a vein, and to maintain blood pressure
  • Safe maintenance of blood pressure and body temperature – a must for safety and comfort
  • The comfort of knowing that your pet is cared for by experienced veterinarians, and by Ontario Registered Veterinary Technicians for hands-on nursing care
  • All re-checks following surgery

Please ask us if you wish to see ‘behind the scenes’ to where your pet will stay, and to see the surgical suite.

What is Neutering?

For male cats and dogs, neutering ‘orchidectomy’ surgery involves the surgical removal (-ectomy) of the testicles (orchid-) as a sterile procedure, under general anesthetic.

The surgery is performed by a licensed, experienced veterinary surgeon here at the Clarkson Village Animal Hospital.

Should I Have My Male Cat or Dog Neutered?

We recommend neutering all male pets who are not going to be used for breeding or showing, as an important part of basic preventive health care.

This decision is made easier knowing the benefits that you are making for your pet’s future health.

What are the Advantages of Neutering My Cat?

  • Reduces the urge to escape to find a mate and enlarge his territory, thereby reducing roaming and keeping your pet safer.
  • Reduces disease exposure. While increasing his territory, your pet will come into contact with other cats and fight for dominance. Cat bites can transmit diseases causing AIDS-like syndromes and Feline Leukemia Virus. Bite wounds can also result in severe infections and abscesses often requiring surgical repair.
  • Eliminates testicular diseases such as cancer, trauma, and infection.
  • Reduces aggressive behaviour.
  • Reduces urine marking and urine odour in the house.
  • Prevents unwanted litters and the needless deaths of kittens and cats.

What are the Advantages of Neutering My Dog?

  • Reduces the urge to escape to find a mate, thereby reducing roaming and keeping your pet safer.
  • Eliminates testicular diseases such as cancer, trauma, and infection.
  • Reduces aggressive behaviour.
  • Prevents many prostate gland diseases.
  • Reduces urine marking in the house.
  • Likely prevention of hernias and peri-anal tumors.

What are the Disadvantages of Neutering My Pet?

Many people have misconceptions about the outcomes of neutering your pet.

For example, we are often asked about the risks of obesity after neutering. Obesity results from overfeeding a pet at the time of his life when he simply needs less, not more food. Neutered pets usually eat about the same amount of food that they ate before surgery, but they tend to expend less energy because neutering reduces sexual interest and roaming.

When this happens, some pets may have a tendency to gain weight. You should always monitor your pet’s weight and, if necessary, adjust the amount or type of food being fed. Proper nutrition is always important.

Neutering does not cause detrimental changes in personality, playfulness, intelligence, or affection.

How Old Should My Pet Be When He is Neutered?

We recommend neutering at 9-18 months of age, depending on your pet’s size at maturity. However, if your pet is urinating around the house or aggressive you may consider neutering earlier.

Is the Operation Dangerous?

Orchidectomy is a surgical procedure, requiring general anesthesia and performed by an experienced veterinary surgeon using high quality materials under sterile conditions. With our modern anesthetics, blood pressure monitoring, standard use of intra-operative intravenous fluids, and experienced monitoring staff, the risk of anesthetic complication is exceedingly low.

Before surgery, your dog or cat will be given a physical examination. Pre-anesthetic blood testing is recommended to assess your pet’s internal organ function, in order to design a safe anesthetic regimen specifically for your animal.

Regardless of your dog or cat’s age or health status, we will work with you to do everything possible to keep your loved one safe and comfortable.

What Happens to My Cat During the Surgery?

The anesthetized patient, lying on his side, is shaved around the surgical site, and the skin is prepped with anti-bacterial solutions for surgery.

The procedure involves making a small incision in the scrotum and surgically removing the testicles. Sutures are rarely required.

The patient recovers from anesthetic in about 5-10 minutes, is sitting up in about 15-30 minutes, and walking within an hour or so.

Analgesics (pain medications) are administered before, during, and after surgery, to provide a comfortable recovery. Our highly experienced operating room nurses are with your pet during the full recovery period to ensure the safest possible recovery.

What Happens to My Dog During the Surgery?

The anesthetized patient, lying on his back, is shaved around the surgical site, and the skin is prepped with sterile solutions for surgery.

The procedure involves making a mid-line incision and surgically removing the testicles. There are sterile dissolvable sutures at the internal incision sites, with the same suture material holding the inner layer of the skin together.

The patient recovers from anesthetic in about 5-10 minutes, is sitting up in about 15-30 minutes, and walking within an hour or two.

Analgesics (pain medications) are administered before, during, and after surgery, to provide a comfortable recovery. Our highly experienced operating room nurses are with your pet during the full recovery period to ensure that no problems can arise.

What Post-Operative Precautions Should I Take?

Everything will be carefully explained to you after your pet’s surgery, regarding surgery, post-op medications (for pain control) and care.

When you get home, offer only small amounts of food and water at a time for the first night. Normal feeding can be resumed over the next day or two.

Almost 100% of the time, patients recover “too quickly”, and keeping your pet quiet is the toughest job of all!

Precautions for Cats

Your cat’s incision should be checked daily for any redness or swelling. You should call us if your cat constantly licks or chews his incision, if you see any redness or swelling, if your cat seems depressed, or if he won’t eat.

We are open all nights, and all day on weekends and holidays, should unexpected problems arise. Everything will be carefully explained to you after your pet’s surgery.

Important: Please give no home medications without approval from our veterinarian. Drugs such as Tylenol, Advil, and Aspirin are absolutely toxic to cats. If your pet seems uncomfortable, call us, as additional pain medication is available if needed.

Precautions for Dogs

Rest and restricted activity are the primary post-operative care you should provide for the first week or two. Most dogs can resume normal activity about a week after surgery. Until then, leash walks, no running or climbing stairs, and lots of rest are the rule. Tranquilizers are available if your dog is too active and it is difficult to restrict activity.

You must prevent your dog from licking the surgical area. To help avoid this, he will be sent home with an Elizabethan collar which should be worn whenever he is un-supervised.

Your dog’s incision needs to be checked daily because if there is too much activity, the scrotum may swell after surgery due to blood or serum accumulation. If this happens, or if the incision is red and swollen or oozing, please call us. You should also call if your pet constantly licks or chews his incision, seems depressed, or won’t eat.

We use dissolvable skin sutures. The sutures and incision will be checked at your follow-up visit.

The emergency clinic is open all night, and all day on weekends and holidays, should unexpected problems arise. Everything will be carefully explained to you after your pet’s surgery.

Important: Please give no home medications without approval from our veterinarian. If your pet seems uncomfortable, call us, as additional pain medication is available if needed.

Contact us to book a neutering appointment for your male dog or cat.

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